Author Topic: Tum Pai  (Read 8193 times)

Offline Jon Loren

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Tum Pai
« on: August 07, 2004, 07:14:36 PM »
  Tum Pai is simply the internal side of Kajukenbo.  The internal structure is based on Tai Chi translated into Kajukenbo technique as a soft style, delivering the Kajukenbo thump!
  Tum Pai, meaning Central Way, adds Chin-na grappling, its own brand of chi sau, and leg trapping.

--GM Jon A. Loren

Forms:
Tum Pai has 3 concentrations, 5 internal structural forms, 17 Night Wind forms, 18 weapon forms  --  all done in internal soft style technique.

Offline Mitch Powell

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Re:Tum Pai
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2004, 08:49:53 PM »
GM Loren,
We have been waiting for you! It's great to have you on the cafe. There are many of us who do not know much about Tum Pai, other than it's part of Kajukenbo.

Please, sir, could you give us some history about the development of Tum Pai. I would also like to know where the forms came from that you use and which lineage of t'ai chi is used in Tum Pai-Wu, Yang, Sun, etc.

Again, it's great to have you on the cafe, sharing your knowledge and experience with us.

Mitch

Powell's MMA Academy (KSDI#549)
Grandmaster Mitch Powell (Emperado Method)
(707) 344-1655  coachmitchpowell@hotmail.com

Offline Jon Loren

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Re:Tum Pai
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2004, 11:20:06 AM »
  The original Tum Pai was started by Sijo, Grandmaster Dacascos, and Grandmaster Al Dela Cruz.  Later this became Chuan-fa and the name Tum Pai went into limbo. In late 1974 while staying with Sijo and his family I showed him what I had compiled from my years in internal training, and had formatted it into Kajukenbo.  This was compiled from my internal training in Maylasia, China, and training under Professor Joseph Clarke in Kajukenbo.  At that time I got permission to call this work Tum Pai.  It took another ten years (1984) to get it certified as the soft-style branch in Kajukenbo.  Since then it has evolved ten-fold into what it is today - 20 years later!  
  The Tai Chi forms taught in Tum Pai are - in progressive order are the traditional Yang style, Ng style, Wu style, and Chen style.  Tum Pai structure is based on all of these, then combined with my earlier training to produce the Tum Pai form, based the best I could on the traditional Kajukenbo form.  For instance, the concentration which originally came from Augung Ramos who developed 13 concentration forms.  I learned these under Professor Clarke and Augung Ramos.  Later I compiled all of them into 3 concentrations under soft style guidelines.  
  For a complete history, our website will be out to the public within a month.

Offline David V. Amiccuci

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Re:Tum Pai
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2004, 09:57:12 AM »
Welcome GM Loren

Its great that you have accepted your position as the moderator of the Tum Pai Section. I'm sorry that you were unable to make the Las Vegas trip. Simoe Leah and I look forward to speaking to you soon. I want to thank you for always being their for Ahgung throught all of the years. I think it would be great for you to explain about the Tum Pai's Wu Tech Code of training. Again welcome.

David
Grand Master David V. Amiccuci
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Successor to GGM Ahgung Tony Ramos Kajukenbo/Ramos Method
Cacoy World Doce Pares
 8th Grade Eskrima
7th Grade Eskrido
6th Grade Pangamot
Under SGM Cacoy Canete

Offline Jon Loren

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Re:Tum Pai
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2004, 12:12:51 AM »
Hi Sigung Amiccuci,
  Thanks for the post!  Your Father-in-Law, Augung Ramos, I treasured and loved.  I have always held the utmost respect for him, and he has helped my path in the martial arts in more ways than he realized.  A lot of practicioners will also feel the same way that I do, for he was a teacher for life.
  I have the original writing of Tum Pai's - Tai Chi Wu Teh Code of Ethics - which is the code of training.  It's long, but I could put it into 5 installments if you would like the whole thing.  One installment a week - if enough practitioners are interested in this type of thing.  
 
This is the first introduction installment.  The Tai Chi info can represent any style in the martial arts.

  TUM PAI'S TAI CHI CODE OF TRAINING
  The Practicioner's Responsibility.

  Some people are drawn to T'ai Chi Ch'uan because it lacks the martial discipline and tradition, like external Kung-Fu or Karate arts might have.  But this belief stems from a student's or teacher's choice based on their training  background and not the art itself.
  One can make an art into anything they want, but the fact is that T'ai Chi Ch'uan as a complete art is one of the more rooted martial arts steeped in ethics and tradition.
  I have found from my years of training that schools and teachers with tradition and martial code endure with time, but the ones who do not possess these qualities "pass with no roots."  Our society seems to shun "old-time ethics" but in the martial arts world it is very "present" and important to have an understanding of "order" to really grow and survive.
  To most beginning T'ai Chi students and some practitioners of this art, it would seem that T'ai Chi is a way to relax the body and mind, regulate the breath, correct posture problems, and, in effect, realign one's very "being."  A student pays for classes the way he or she would pay for anything else.  But this is an external view point of an internal art.
  The T'ai Chi Ch'uan approach to martial arts is much gentler than the external martial arts, yet the "code of ethics" is essential to both internal and external.
  Though a part of ethics is instilled to control one's combativeness to a point, its main goal is to learn an inner relationship of respect and understanding toward one's teacher, fellow students, ourselves and even to the school or space we learn from.  This also helps open pathways for our internal understandings and energy awareness.
  I have written some of the obvious and not so obvious concepts from the "Wu Teh Code," commonly referred to as the "Code of Ethics" in more Western terms.  Hopefully this will give everyone concerned, including external artists, some guide lines for what is involved and required of inner art understanding and one's relationship to T'ai Chi Ch'uan as a complete art.  
  These rules will not only help you understand this art and its players, but it will make you a much stronger practitioner if you adhere to the code of ethics in all arts.
  Our belief is that the practitioner who has a strong code will aslo have a strong art coupled with wisdom.
  The following rules are in no particular order.  The order is your reponsibility to understand, for if you empty your cup of tea you will see your strengths and your weaknesses and, individually, will have your priorities to work on toward self-perfection.

[End of 1st Installment]

--GM Jon A. Loren

Offline Serene

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Re:Tum Pai
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2004, 06:28:03 PM »
Welcome GM Loren. ;D

We are very fortunate to have you aboard.

THANK YOU.

My best to you and your students.

Soifua,
Sifu Serene Terrazas
Head Instructor
Terrazas Kajukenbo
American Canyon, Ca.

Offline David V. Amiccuci

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Re:Tum Pai
« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2004, 03:23:14 PM »
GM Loren

Thank you and I think their is enough interest.

Thanks
Grand Master David V. Amiccuci
9th Deg Red/Silver Belt 9th Degree Red Silver/ Sash
Successor to GGM Ahgung Tony Ramos Kajukenbo/Ramos Method
Cacoy World Doce Pares
 8th Grade Eskrima
7th Grade Eskrido
6th Grade Pangamot
Under SGM Cacoy Canete

Matt@AKF

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Re:Tum Pai
« Reply #7 on: August 19, 2004, 03:49:15 PM »
YES ,    1 more vote for the code of ethics
 :D :P

Offline Brandi Ross

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Re:Tum Pai
« Reply #8 on: August 19, 2004, 07:25:50 PM »
Aloha GM Loren,

I, too, would be interested in reading more.

Mahalo and aloha,

Brandi
Brandi Ross
Black Belt
Kingi's Kajukenbo
GM Rick Kingi
formerly under Sigung Alex Cadang

Offline Jon Loren

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Re:Tum Pai
« Reply #9 on: August 19, 2004, 07:37:30 PM »
[This is the second installment of Tum Pai's Tai Chi Wu Teh Code of Training]

  WU TEH'S PERSONAL INTERRELATIONSHIP

  1.  Always honor one's family, and give without the expectation of receiving.  Strive for family honor.  It is a lifetime responsibility.  
  2.  Second to one's family, honor your teacher.  They are to be treated like a father or mother who give you the art of life.  Give and sacrifice without the expectation of receiving.  It is a lifetime responsibility for one's official teacher.
  3.  Treat your fellow students as a brother or sister.  By giving and helping them to be better,  in truth this will strengthen yourself.
  4.  Senior students, be humble.  Treat junior students as equals, thus, enabling you to have the respect and position of senior.
  5.  Junior students, be respectful to your senior. Their treatment of you as an equal is a sign that they are starting to understand a deeper T'ai Chi Ch'uan and are worthy of senior respect.  This humbleness is to be respected.
  6.  Never consider yourself knowledgable, regardless of time in training.  We are only on a staircase that is very long and with no apparent end.
  7.  Recognize that everyone will have strengths greater than yourself and weaknesses, regardless of their time in the art.  Try to help their weaknesses.  In turn, your weaknesses will be eventually strengthened.
  8.  Senior students are responsible to demonstrate the "code of ethics" in and out of class.  This example shows that you yourself don't consider your art seperate from your every day life, that it is part of everything.  This demonstrates the strength of your art and makes good practitioners and teachers.
  9.  Rely on your teacher's judgement as best as one can.  Many times you may not agree with policies, or actions, but it is your responsibility to stand behind them and strive for better understanding as junior students do towards you.  Remember one is just on a step and possibly the next step will give you better understanding.
  10.  Remember teachers are human.  They make mistakes and have human problems like anyone else.  Realize that no one will be a perfect example.  It is this kindness and understanding that makes you strong by respecting this humanness and appreciating their gains of self-perfection in T'ai Chi Ch'uan totalness.
  11.  Be an example of courtesy, regardless of what step you are on in T'ai Chi Ch'uan.  Courtesy in and out of class is a sign of strength.  By giving courtesy, you get courtesy and respect.

[End of second installment]

--GM Jon A. Loren

Offline Young_Blood

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Re:Tum Pai
« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2004, 01:43:33 AM »
I would just like to say thank you for the code of ethics, i am a new practioner of the Tony Ramos Method and i am humbbled by the respect that is shown through this whole Kajukenbo system. I hope to stay and continue my training until i am old. This is my first post and i hope to have many more. Thanks Again

Humbly,

Andrew Lawless

TRK for Live, Hello Sigung

"The Skillful Warrior know his own Invulnerability and seeks his enemies vulnerability, and exploits it and through this way one can be victorious."