Author Topic: Master of Kajukenbo?  (Read 23301 times)

Offline KajuJKDFighter

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Re: Master of Kajukenbo?
« Reply #30 on: August 26, 2005, 01:29:43 AM »
I'm working on mastery in all aspects of the arts mentioned and some more and if I live till 200 years old, I bet I'll have some Sweet techniques......even if it's with my cane-sword and false teeth throwing stars....
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Offline Mitch Powell

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Re: Master of Kajukenbo?
« Reply #31 on: August 26, 2005, 07:51:13 PM »
Professor Sedeno.
How are you, sir? This tread is for us to really look at who we are as Kajukenboists. To look at those around us and be honest about the skills we see or possess. Who are our real Kajukenbo masters? To be in that group one must still practice and be able to demonstrate their actual mastery. That means to look outside their hearts and move beyound loyalty and sentiments and say what we know.

First of all we have to have our Sijo at the top of the list and his brother Joe. Those were the guys back in the day and no one can dispute that. I never saw either one of the, so I can only go by what was told to me over the years. Brutal--just plain brutal!

When you talk about tough guys from the first group I think Walter Godin. Look at Hackleman and Liddel. Those are from his lineage.

The Bunda brothers were supposed to be pretty bad guys as well. I heard soem stories about how tough they were. Same with John and Tony Ramos. A couple island boys who could take care of business. John Ramos is still a tough guy. I saw a tape of Cal Shin demonstrating his forms and techniques back in the early 1960s as a young black belt. He was amazing. You'd have to see the tape to truly appreciate how good he was.

Now, my original question had to do with people you had actually seen, So, here it goes. I've said it before and I'll say it here. Of all the Kajukenbo martial artists I have seen, Sifu Jeff Macalolooy is the best. His techniques and forms are text book. He can fight traditional sparring, grappling, sticks or boxing. He's strong, fast and understands the need for endurance. He is open minded and very humble. Sifu Jeff was trained in Kajukenbo by Professor Joe Bautista, who was trained by GM Emil Bautista. The fruit don't fall too far from the tree!

Of us older folks (more than 40, not yet 50) the best that I have seen is Woody Sims. His Kajukenbo is what GM Bautista taught him in the 70s and 80s. His forms and techniques are excellent. He has won about every tournament you could ever win and would not be someone you would want to meet in the street. He's got great skills and continues to train hard and teach.

From the 50+ group, I was very impressed with GM Rick Kinji when he demonstrated his forms to Sijo at Professor Harper's gathering last year. He looked great. He also taught techniques for three plus hours that day and his techniques were lights out.

GM Gary Forbach proved himself years ago when he released his tapes on Kajukenbo. There have been many schools who learned or expanded their Kajukenbo based solely on GM Gary's tapes.

Al Dacascos and Al Dela Cruz would be at the top of my list as far as the Ch'uan fa masters. I have never seen Al Dacasco but I don't really think that's required with him. Based on what GM Ted Sotelo told me, he at the top of the charts. Now, I have personally seen Al Dela Cruz when he gave us seminars years ago at the school, plus the times he has taught at gatherings. He is so fluid, he moves effortlessly. He has it all-speed, power, whatever......

Emil Bautista in his bartending days was probably about as good as it gets. He had a lot of practice working in the bars. I actually saw him in action one night. Let's just say the only thing I remember is GM punching the guy and the guy hitting the side door with his back, then going out the door backwards until he finally hit the block wall about 8 feet from the door. Very strong hands and quick.

Joe Davis was quite the tough guy in his days as I have learned. Both of these guys are still very strong and they hurt you when they strike you. It's not the same kind of hurt when a young martial artist hits you. It's a deep down in your bone kinda hurt. There's a running joke when you do a technique and Joe Davis is around because he will show you a different ending each time and when he does you get blasted, flipped, choked, whatever..... He want's to make sure you undertsand the technique! Everytime he would go, "let me show you another way you can finsh that," we would start to chuckle because we knew it was coming.

We also have the Kajukenbo guys you don't want to mess with like Prof. Greg Harper and Sigung John Bono. Harper is too tough and too strong, and Bono boxes and grapples with the best of them. It's just not good when a guy can fight in any situation and he weights about 230lbs.

In my hard hitter category, I would put Sifu Rob Peladeau. He hit's really hard.

Most progressive Kajukenboist I know is Dennis Peterson. Years ago he started adding the muay tai pads to our training so we could hit full speed during techniques. He later added the Redman, Fist Suit to Kajukenbo. We just recently did a testing and the student had to perform their grab arts and punch arts at full speed against an attacker in the Redman.

Best at forms would go to GM Eric Lee, although Bill Tolentino and Tim Bowles are outstanding as well. All of Hanshi Mitose's students are excellent at forms presentation.

Best at demonstrating techniques at a tournament, either Joe Bautista or Dann Baker. They are both outstanding.

Best at demonstrating Kajukenbo techniques at a seminar is easily GM Angel Garcia from Spain. His techniques are brutal. One thing about the word pain. It feel the same way in english as it does in spanish and his uke always feel pain.

Best Kajukenbo fighter has to be GM Ted Sotelo. Ch'uan fa, Boxing, grappling, sticks, whatever..... He's so good at fighting he could probably put your eye out with a rock from across the street!

That's my list for what it's worth. All great Kajukenbo martial artists, and I'm sure I left off many. Based on the ability to demonstrate mastery of Kajukenbo, my hat goes off to Sifu Jeff Macalolooy.

Who's on your list?
« Last Edit: August 26, 2005, 07:54:27 PM by Mitch Powell »
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Offline MARK GERRY

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Re: Master of Kajukenbo?
« Reply #32 on: August 27, 2005, 04:03:51 AM »
   MASTER

1) A worker qualified to teach apprentices and carry on the craft independently
2) One whose teachings or doctrines are accepted by followers
3) A male teacher, schoolmaster, or tutor
4) One that has control over another or others
5) An employer
6) The man who serves as the head of a household
7) An artist or performer of great and exemplary skill
8)Used as a title
9)The captain of a merchant ship

and..................


10) A man who owns a pack of hounds or is the chief officer of a hunt. ;D ;D ;D ;D
« Last Edit: August 27, 2005, 04:08:10 AM by SIGUNG MARK GERRY »
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Re: Master of Kajukenbo?
« Reply #33 on: August 28, 2005, 04:33:03 PM »
I have seen a few MASTERS of Kajukenbo through the years, but of those currently active whom I have been exposed to,  I would have agree with Prof. Powell, that Sifu Jeff Macalolooy is by far the best. 

While looking for a dojo for my two children(a 5 year search), I had NOT been able to find a home for them that was acceptable to me, based on my early training in Kaju..  Upon driving down Union City Blvd. from the International Market, I spoted the "Dragons Den", seeing the Kaju. coat of arms.  Once inside the dojo, it brought back so many memories, since I had not been active for 10 years due to family reasons.  Meeting Sifu Jeff and seeing how he instructed his classes affirmed for me where my children would begin their training.

Anothing thing which I had never told Sifu Jeff, was that it was him who inspired me to train again.  I have already lost 15 pounds and feeling better in every aspect of my being. 

May God grant him many years!

Timothy Vargas

Offline V. F. Mateo

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Re: Master of Kajukenbo?
« Reply #34 on: August 30, 2005, 03:32:35 PM »
I did talk with Sifu Jeff in Vallejo. His forefathers came from the Philippines and my father came from that country to Hawaii. I would like to say that my father was a master and I trained with him. He had several swords that was confiscated by HPD (honolulu police dept) because of situations. My father and his family also fought for their country with swords and knifes against other countries. I have trained with a few masters from Hawaii via China, Japan, Philippines. The knowledge gain is incredible. The knowledge lost is also unforgiven. We must continue to strive and bring into the next generation the skills we have learn. To teach the goodness into this life a masterful conception. My forefathers have died for their country and to me they were masters. I have seen  Kenpo brothers before we were Kajukenbo fight in the streets. Their skills were tested and to me they were masters. We can teach, communicate, and demonstrate and be masters but fighting in the streets involve different mastering. I have never fought in the ring but I have fought in the streets of Hawaii, Kansas, Texas, and Washington. I thank the man up above that I am still alive to teach once again the goodness in this world and bring masters into our next generation. But to find someone that can reach that master level-professor level takes a special person. One must be motivated, self-aware, & self-regulate to master fear & strength. Wesley Sipes brought on the big screen Masters of Martial Arts and we were represented by few of our braves. Bill Ryusaki, Al Dacascos, Benny Urquidez, and more of our Kenpo/Kajukenbo brothers. I think to be a master one must have the blood line-the skills are in the chromosones of warrior blood. There are people in our organization that are the quiet ones and they are unknown masters of our art.

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Offline Sifu Sin Bin

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Re: Master of Kajukenbo?
« Reply #35 on: August 30, 2005, 09:02:01 PM »
I think to be a master one must have the blood line-the skills are in the chromosones of warrior blood.

 I think that is a bunch of crap. While I admit that genetics play a part, to say that one has to be a descendant is ridiculous. The family tree has to start and end somewhere, other wise you would be able to trace all warriors to a common root.
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Offline dastars

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Re: Master of Kajukenbo?
« Reply #36 on: August 30, 2005, 09:46:33 PM »
Genetics --> body type, reaction time (maybe), disposition and influence intelligence
Beyond that, whether you become a martial arts master or a MLB superstar (or a couch potato) is a matter of choices and environment.
Geoff Hurd - Student of Professor Walt Andrae (SGM Halbuna) - Augusta, GA

University of Pittsburgh Kajukenbo

Offline V. F. Mateo

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Re: Master of Kajukenbo?
« Reply #37 on: August 30, 2005, 11:07:37 PM »
Sifu Rob, It's just my thought. Your crap, my crap it's all the same.

V. Frank Mateo
« Last Edit: August 31, 2005, 03:10:31 PM by V. F. Mateo »
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Offline Sifu Sin Bin

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Re: Master of Kajukenbo?
« Reply #38 on: August 31, 2005, 04:11:58 AM »
It's all crap then eh 8)
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Offline Mitch Powell

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Re: Master of Kajukenbo?
« Reply #39 on: August 31, 2005, 09:37:14 AM »
Have you ever heard Frank Sinatra Jr. sing? Genetics may not be all that important! Desire, hard work, good environment, good teacher.....................
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Offline V. F. Mateo

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Re: Master of Kajukenbo?
« Reply #40 on: August 31, 2005, 02:36:49 PM »
All good points of being a master. The young will inherit the earth, as the elder will instill wisdom. Put together the young will become both the old and new. Blood line, enviroment, desire, good teacher all important.

PEACE  :)
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Offline SA_Kajukenbo

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Re: Master of Kajukenbo?
« Reply #41 on: September 16, 2005, 03:09:14 PM »
Only one I have personally trained with, Prof Allen Abad.
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Offline Brandi Ross

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Re: Master of Kajukenbo?
« Reply #42 on: September 16, 2005, 06:10:28 PM »
I don't get involved with the discussions too much anymore.  However, I do enjoy reading them and gaining insight from everyone.  So much knowledge can be gained from just reading what others have said.  So, to my point:

As long as I am alive, I will always be a student.  I love to learn and I love to be part of the knowledge tree.  I look at everyone as a "giver of knowledge".  I've learned from GM Davis, GM Soleto, GM Kingi, GM Dela Cruz, GM Bautista, GM Ordonez, Prof. Powell, Prof. Bautista, Prof. Sedeno, Prof. Scott, Sigungs Tyrrell, Sigung Bishop, Sigung Solis, Sifu Serene, Sife Evans and Sifu Barber-Evans, etc., etc., etc.

How you might ask...From listening to what has been said in  Las Vegas, to reading the posts, to talking with everyone.  I have learned so much and hope to continue learning from everyone here as I keep reading the posts.

Thank you all for sharing your thoughts, knowledge, and skills with the rest of us.

I am just a student hoping to learn from everyone and from every rank and skill level.  Knowledge can be gained in the most unique of situations...

Thanks,
Brandi
« Last Edit: September 16, 2005, 07:23:52 PM by Brandi Ross »
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Offline rockatear

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Re: Master of Kajukenbo?
« Reply #43 on: September 17, 2005, 12:48:29 AM »
I'm posting in this section since its a genral martial arts talk.  Someone very close to me is looking for a school to train with in Hayward, California.  He is a 1st degree black belt and his main interest is sparring and conditioning.  He's not so hot on doing forms (yet, he's very good at them), but if it's a good school he'll consider joining the school.  His background is Kajukenbo and that's all I want to say about that at this time.

I know Kaju is not just about sparring and conditioning, but if there is a school that puts special emphasis on that part of our art, please let me know.  He's a wonderful student and I would hate to see us lose him in our art or for him to become so discourage that he gives it up our style.  Please let me know at your earliest convenience.

with respect,
Shirley Phelps, blue blelt, Hand to Hand Kajukenbo Self-Defense Center, Oakland, CA, www.handtohandkajukenbo.com, Gaylord Method, Chief Head Instructors:  Sifus Jen Resnick and Sonya Richardson

Offline MARK GERRY

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Re: Master of Kajukenbo?
« Reply #44 on: September 17, 2005, 01:11:49 AM »
U.S. Karate School of the Arts and Boxing Gym
20613 Mission Boulevard
Hayward, CA  94541
USA
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