Author Topic: Teaching Humility  (Read 2717 times)

Offline Kaju Bear

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Teaching Humility
« on: February 21, 2006, 06:06:34 PM »
How do you teach humility to your students? What percentage of your lessons on humility, are done verbally through stories or lecture and how much is expressed in a more physical method like deliberate dominance in sparring for example?

I am curious always about the process that others have used to ensure balance of the student’s ego when extreme skill sets are taught then mastered.

Sifu Morg Olsen
3rd degree, Emperado Method, Senior Grand Master Kaanana
1st degree, Tum Pai, Grand Master Robert Heuer

Offline Jason Goldsmith

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Re: Teaching Humility
« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2006, 10:58:08 AM »
I would say a 40%/60% mix.  I talk about humility and respecting others often, but I find the best lessons come when my students start getting cocky, and I end up needing to dominate them in sparring.  The learning by doing seems to be the most effective.
Sifu Jason Goldsmith
5th Degree, Wun Hop Kuen Do Kung Fu
Under GM Al Dacascos
Instructor--WHKD
Durham NC and Philadelphia PA
www.tkfmma.com

Offline sifutimg

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Re: Teaching Humility
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2006, 12:11:41 PM »
The Best way I feel to teach this is through example.  When the students see you living and expressing a humble life that gives them the opportunity to choose (or not) that for themselves.  My experience is that the negative ego is tied to the ability to express oneself in a humble way.  The negative ego being that part of us that I feel is fear based with insecurity at the forefront for the individual as it applies to this discussion.  In other words one will express themselves in such a way that will never expose and hide any weakness, emotional (mostly), mentally, physically, spiritually, or otherwise.  In our culture people get caught up in status thing or keeping up with the Jones's and don't want to face their true self and the negative ego builds in such a way to provide a kind of protection.  But we know it's not protection at all.  The negative ego is susceptible to being blind sided because it's the tendency of the negative ego to hide behind the various masks that one can create.  So it's all really illusion.  This is why I love the mat.  There is unmistakable truth on the mat.  It doesn't lie.  On the mat all the cards are on the table for everyone to see.  How many of us through the years felt some sort of insecurity showcasing ourselves on the mat learning new material or when being tested.  Over time I feel that students start to get used to experiencing this level of discomfort especially as they see themselves grow.  That's when the individual may start to see how to transcend this traning into daily life.  It's up to us as (I feel but not in a baby sitting way) instructors to recognize a persons character in such a way to keep everyone safe in their training while keeping the training as realistic as possible.  This of course is all my opinion and am constantly working to understand these aspects of our training/teaching.  So in summary it's by example and aspects of the mat that help a student discover a humble attitude or nature.

Cheers,
Sigung Tim Gagnier
Grandmaster Tim Gagnier
Student of Great Grandmaster Charles Gaylord & Grandmaster Sid Lopez
Chief Instructor Pacific Wind Kajukenbo
Student Forever
Yamhill, Oregon

Offline SA_Kajukenbo

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Re: Teaching Humility
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2006, 04:33:03 PM »
I agree with Sigung Tim Gagnier.  I don't think one can necessarily "teach" humility.  One can demostrate humility and one can learn/reach/achieve humility.  It is true that if a student gets cocky, they can be shown the error of their ways.  Does this "teach" them or do they achieve humility in this manner?  Possible, I suppose, but I don't think so.  Other "lessons" could also be learned from this method.  No, I think humility demonstrated is the best way for someone else to "learn" humility.  Utlimately, it is something they will have to achieve within themselves.
Sifu John Hood KSDI#4001
5th Degree
Pastor - His Time Missions; Ebenezer SMC
"There is an appointed time for everything. And there is a time for every event under Heaven." Ecclesiastes 3:1

Offline Jason Goldsmith

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Re: Teaching Humility
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2006, 07:52:52 PM »
I agree that in the end, one must learn humility for themselves, and that the best way to teach it is to practice it.  However, as an instructor of college students, I find that often-times my students will overestimate their capabilities--especially the really strong ones.  Consequently, sometimes the "mat" comes into play and they get put in their place.  They seem to learn from this, and it is a deliberate choice on my part to have them learn this lession.  Typically, I spar or work with my students at their level--such that they always seem to have a fighting chance.  Unfortunately, this can cause a false sense of skill and confidence-- a surge of ego, and thus sometimes I find this has to be adjusted.
Sifu Jason Goldsmith
5th Degree, Wun Hop Kuen Do Kung Fu
Under GM Al Dacascos
Instructor--WHKD
Durham NC and Philadelphia PA
www.tkfmma.com

Offline Mark Dinkel

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Re: Teaching Humility
« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2006, 07:59:11 AM »
I do not think everyone teaches humility, unfortunately. I know a group of people who walk around acting as if they are minor deities in the shadow of a greater deity and everyone else is sub human or a lower class of life. My belief, if there is fecal matter at the bottom of the hill, you have to know that it also is at the top, because crap rolls down hill.

For those of you that do teach or instill humility, please keep it up. The world, particularly your small part of the world, will be a better place for it, and your students will treat their students with the respect they, or any other human, deserves.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2006, 09:04:18 AM by Mark Dinkel »
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Offline Menwinn Morales

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Re: Teaching Humility
« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2006, 11:00:25 AM »
Humility is something that every instructor at many times throughout ones training will eventually instill in his students. Once a student starts developing certain skills he or she may become cocky. It's o.k. to be cocky but you must also be humble. Know your place,  someone out there is training harder and longer than you are. There is someone stronger, faster, and more knowledgable than you. This is what my instructor has said to us during many long, exhausting, and humbling training sesssions. He always knew when to put us back in our place whenever we needed to be reminded. As an instructor you will develop many creative ways to get your point across, just use your imagination.
Sifu Menwinn Morales, 5th degree
Rapacon's Martial Arts, Vallejo, Ca.