Author Topic: Teaching Yourself  (Read 6329 times)

Offline John Bishop

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Re: Teaching Yourself
« Reply #15 on: March 21, 2003, 06:22:40 AM »
Don't get me wrong.  My present instructor was not my first instructor, and I have trained in other styles.  
I'm just saying that it is possible to find the right instructor that you can continue to grow with.  
No really good instructor would want to hold back his black belts from learning more from someone else.  
And I think it is this concern for your students growth that makes the bond between you and them even stronger.  
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »
John Bishop  8th Degree-Original Method 
Under Grandmaster Gary Forbach
K.S.D.I. # 478, FMAA


"You watch, once I'm gone, all the snakes will start popping their heads up!"  Sijo Emperado

ShaolinKempoSensei

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Re: Teaching Yourself
« Reply #16 on: March 21, 2003, 06:44:15 AM »
Good point, Sigung.  Your students have a fine instructor.  Perhaps someday I will be able to meet you in person.  

NH and CA are kind of far away from each other!  Are you planning any east coast trips in the future?   :)
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »

Offline John Bishop

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Re: Teaching Yourself
« Reply #17 on: March 21, 2003, 09:01:47 AM »
I'm just trying to pass on the values my instructor taught me.  :D
Don't have any plans to travel to the east coast, but who knows what the future holds.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »
John Bishop  8th Degree-Original Method 
Under Grandmaster Gary Forbach
K.S.D.I. # 478, FMAA


"You watch, once I'm gone, all the snakes will start popping their heads up!"  Sijo Emperado

Offline John Erickson

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Re: Teaching Yourself
« Reply #18 on: March 30, 2003, 01:24:05 PM »
I'm a little late replying to this post, but here's my opinion:
I believe that the answer to this question certainly depends upon who your instructor is.  As I've mentioned in prior posts, I sort of "lucked" into a great instructor and I've been studying under him since 1989.  Over the years I've taken several breaks from formal classes due to personal situations. My rank during these times was 2nd dan.  I can see a point that when you are on your own, thinking for yourself, you develop a certain understanding of your art.

However, my instructor has learned from some very renowned masters.  Why wouldn't I want to take advantage of what people have spent a lifetime learning and perfecting?  

I don't think that there is a definitive answer on this topic.  At 3rd dan a student should have enough understanding of their art to teach and flourish on thier own.  Is this better than continuing to learn from a competent master?  Some students may be better off leaving their instructor at some point in time.  I don't see this being the case for me.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »
Sensei John Erickson, Sandan.  Professor Joe Shuras, Blackstone Kempo Karate/ Shihan Kathy Shuras, Milford Studio of Self Defense.

Karazenpo

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Re: Teaching Yourself
« Reply #19 on: March 30, 2003, 03:12:14 PM »
Sensei John Erickson: Thank you for the compliment, John. The only thing I can say and it will be short and sweet. I'm 51 years old, been in the arts since '73, kempo since '74 and I am currently a little sore from my training yesterday at Grandmaster Pesare's Kaito Gakko. I'm still a student. ;)

                                                    Shihan Joe

 
PS: Hanshi Craig Seavey,9th dan, and my first kempo instructor still studies under Professor Larry Garron, Soke.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:03 PM by -1 »

sigungjoe

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Re: Teaching Yourself
« Reply #20 on: May 01, 2003, 06:18:50 PM »
I agree with sigung Bishop. Once you found your instructor, it becomes like family. you never leave your dad, so why should you leave your instructor? I may one day surpass my father in ability mentally and physically. But knowledge and experience come with time and age, and my instructor will always be ahead of me in that aspect. Besides, a good father, and/or instructor will always be behind you in your search to better yourself. And on another perspective. Your Dad/Instructor usually knows what makes you tick and can push the right buttons or explain things in terminology that you can understand. Yes I agree that you need to go out and better your beloved art, but there are just some things especially in the higher ranks that you cannot correct yourself.
Just my humble opinion, aloha.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »

Kempo-Sensei

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Re: Teaching Yourself
« Reply #21 on: May 02, 2003, 06:19:06 AM »
I think "good instructor" are the key words there.  However, I don't agree with the statement that you can't correct certain things in the higher ranks.  The word can't is to "black and white" for me.

So many of the grandmasters of today, that are over 60, didn't train with their instructor for very long before creating their own art.  So if that were true, then all these grandmasters must have based their entire arts off a limited amount of knowledge.  All of the higher ranking knowledge would still need to be corrected.

Maybe that is true?

But personally I think that once you are started in the right direction, that is, the direction of learning.  You will always be able to improve yourself.  Whether you train everyday with your instructor or not.

But don't get me wrong, I think it's very important to have an instructor around to offer ideas, and keep you on the right track.  But if we only listen to our instructor, then we will never grow beyond their abilities.

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »

Offline Enfemus

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Re: Teaching Yourself
« Reply #22 on: November 11, 2005, 07:22:34 PM »
I can't teach myself anything, not even how to fall down..... :'(
Brian Thompson
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Offline Mark Dinkel

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Re: Teaching Yourself
« Reply #23 on: January 17, 2006, 12:32:21 AM »
When I teach, I learn. Not always, but something usually.

With respect to what a teacher needs to be, I think it is more a function of what the student needs. Always getting back to consumerism. Maybe someday I will not. However, I think a teacher teaching children more than likely needs to be different than a teacher teaching adults. This comparison is purely for an example and should not be construed as the only differentiation of students.

One thing I did back in 1992 when I ventured into the MBA program at the U of AZ (U of A to Zonies and fans) was that I learned to learn. My instructors were not going to spoon feed me, and memorization was not going to get me far. I think I am fortunate to be able to apply this to life and martial arts as well.

On a different note, I often wonder if one is taught or one learns. I have to believe that one learns, and a teacher is possibly merely a facilitator of the educational process. So the question then arises, does one always need a teacher. I am not sure. I am sure I could learn more about accounting and business than I already know (other than simply keeping abreast of the changes that occur in the areas I utilize regularly). But would that additional knowledge have utility? Greater than its costs? I do not refer to costs merely in monetary terms. Usually, in my opinion, money is the cheapest part of the educational process. The time devoted and other opportunites forgone are much more valuable.

With respect to a teacher preparing the student for "the real world," I am not sure I have ever had this luxury as a student. At least with respect to my academic and professional careers. Martial arts and the healing arts have been more of a hobby to me.

With respect to studying different arts, with each art that I studied, I evolved in ways I did not imagine. I started with tai qi, then added ba gua, then xing yi, then Kajukenbo. I do question at what point will adding another art not have this impact, and if it is even appropriate to add another due to the concern of being spread too thin.

I have been trying to teach myself a different branch of xing yi than I have been formally taught. I am not sure if I am being 100% successful in duplicating what is presented in the instructional dvd. I do believe some of the reasons I study xing yi are being satisfied.

Well that is my two cents on the comments within this thread. I thought it was a neat topic.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2006, 12:50:20 AM by Mark Dinkel »
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