Author Topic: Kajukenbo in the UFC  (Read 14022 times)

souljahnyne

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Kajukenbo in the UFC
« on: March 11, 2006, 11:01:47 PM »
how come i've never seen kajukenbo used in the mixed martial arts fights of the octagon? it'd definately be an art dat would kinda dominate UFC. hasn't anyone else noticed it? just wondering..it would not only bump up publicity for kajukenbo, but also show the effectiveness of it on all aspects of fighting: ground, strikes, locks, etc. Kajukenbo's well rounded and with the way we train even from the white belt stage.. dun mean to brag but, survival-wise, we know more as a white belt than other while belts of other schools..we're taught from an early age what survival is and what tastes like, so i believe that we have a slight advantage in attitude as well as in knowlege. hehe, anyways yea. that was just a thought. what do u guys think?

Offline John Bishop

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Re: Kajukenbo in the UFC
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2006, 11:11:51 PM »
Adriano Emperado
        |
Walter Godin
       |
John Hackleman
       |
Chuck Liddell  U.F.C. World Champion
« Last Edit: March 11, 2006, 11:13:31 PM by John Bishop »
John Bishop  8th Degree-Original Method 
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Offline Jason Goldsmith

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Re: Kajukenbo in the UFC
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2006, 11:19:47 PM »
That is very interesting!!
Sifu Jason Goldsmith
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Offline Mitch Powell

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Re: Kajukenbo in the UFC
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2006, 01:05:24 AM »
Although Kajukenbo has evolved over the years into many different things, when Sijo Emperado originally created the art is was based on combining kenpo-karate, judo/jujitsu, and boxing.

When the MMA circut first got started they had strikers versus grapplers, but over time most fighters realized they needed a standing and a ground game. They began to combine karate/kenpo kicks, judo and jujitsu locks and throws and boxing. You are looking at a whole bunch of Kajukenbo fighters, they just don't necessarily call what they do Kajukenbo. I think they would if they knew the history.

Sijo Emperado is a visionary who saw the need for combining these arts as far back as 1947. Modern fighters have finally realized what Sijo knew almost 60 years ago. These fighters and trainers haven't created anything knew, they just figured out what Kajukenbo is all about.

With that being said, there is a big difference between training to defend yourself using Kajukenbo as a self defense art, and training to use Kajukenbo in a ring or cage. Most people who train in Kajukenbo learn the art as a means of defending themselves in the street against an un-trained or semi-trained fighter. Training to fight in a ring or cage against a trained fighter requires a very different training method.

A trained fighter has much more skill than your standard martial arts black belt. The whole process of fighting round after round, facing different fighters, running, weight training, ground work, boxing, kick boxing, etc., gives that fighter a big edge when it comes to doing battle.

I can do self defense techniques all day without getting too tired, even full speed against an attacker in a RedMan suit, but boxing or kick boxing a few rounds and maybe adding some grappling justs kicks my butt.

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Offline badsifu

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Re: Kajukenbo in the UFC
« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2006, 10:58:29 AM »
Professor Bishop:

I know his lineage is Kajukenbo, and I am not disputing that.  I haven't seen all of his fights, but the major ones, and I haven't seen a lot of Kajukenbo techniques in there.  Is there a particular fight that does in fact have Kajukenbo in there or perhaps principles that are influenced by Kajukenbo?  Not trying to start a flame or anything, just wanting to get a clearer view.

Thanks

Adriano Emperado
        |
Walter Godin
       |
John Hackleman
       |
Chuck Liddell  U.F.C. World Champion
Dan Tyrrell

Offline John Bishop

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Re: Kajukenbo in the UFC
« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2006, 01:37:32 PM »
I don't think that you can use a lot of Kajukenbo techniques in any kind of mma match.  They're just not designed for a match that dosen't allow groin shots, eye pokes, or throat/neck strikes.   But I do think that you can tell if a fighter comes from a judo/jujitsu background, karate background, kenpo/kajukenbo background, or muay thai background, by their fighting style. 
In watching the few matches of his that I have, I see a predominate standup style with a empahsis on hand strikes.  More boxer type punches then back knuckles, chops, and hammer fists. 
When he is forced to the ground he has some judo skills, but attempts to ground and pound, instead of tap someone out.  He avoids the takedown, and try's to fight standing up as much as possible.  Even when he's taken down, he try's to get back up on his feet as soon as possible.  He is known for his fast multiple hand strikes, which is a trademark of the kajukenbo/kenpo styles, but he limits the hand strikes to those punches and jabs that are most effective in MMA matches.       
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souljahnyne

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Re: Kajukenbo in the UFC
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2006, 10:23:11 PM »
ic.. wow now i understand more.. its just that whenever i watch UFC, i keep on telling myself what things a kajukenbo-ist might do and stuff. well, thanks for enlightening me about the topic, sifus. oh yeah, just wondering, do u guys know of any kajukenbo school in the philippines? i moved here and am looking for 1. thanks either way sifus.

Offline supertim2003

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Re: Kajukenbo in the UFC
« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2006, 11:12:47 AM »
I have seen a UFC fight not too long ago with a Kajukenbo guy, I can't remember his name but his skills looked good so we might be hearing more about him in the future.
Tim Morrow 1st Degree Black Sash Kajukenbo Tum Pai

Offline san-man

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Re: Kajukenbo in the UFC
« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2006, 06:04:18 PM »
You might be thinking of Drew Ficket. 

I do not remember him lineage at this time.  I do remember him being somewhere in the top righthand corner of the 2004 Kajukembo tree.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2006, 06:07:46 PM by san-man »
Carlos Sanchez
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rcollette

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Re: Kajukenbo in the UFC
« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2006, 09:13:29 PM »
Drew Fickett trained for a time with Sigung Chris Valdez in Tucson, AZ.  He trianed in JiuJitsu, Kajukenbo, Muay Thai, and Boxing... it was before I was under Sigung Valdez, so I never met him.


Offline NYKaju

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Re: Kajukenbo in the UFC
« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2006, 11:12:26 AM »
Professor Bishop:

I know his lineage is Kajukenbo, and I am not disputing that.  I haven't seen all of his fights, but the major ones, and I haven't seen a lot of Kajukenbo techniques in there.  Is there a particular fight that does in fact have Kajukenbo in there or perhaps principles that are influenced by Kajukenbo?  Not trying to start a flame or anything, just wanting to get a clearer view.

Thanks

You hit the nail on the head. But the problem is, despite how Chuck comes from Kajukenbo lineage, his school certainly does not teach such. His instructor John Hackleman was a pro-boxer and trained under Godin in Kajukenbo. He had since then left to found Hawaiian Kempo, which is essentially Kajukenbo with even less tradition (ie: forms, unorthodox strikes such as knife hands, pokes, hammer strikes) and more focused on straight up effective fighting and live sparring. Here's an article with an interview with him:


http://www.knucklepit.com/mixed-martial-arts-john_hackleman.htm
Born in New York City on November 21, 1959, John Hackleman was raised in Honolulu, Hawaii, from age four until he turned twenty-four. Whilst at school, John was not interested in the more traditional American sports that lured most kids his age, such as baseball, gridiron and basketball.

"Back when I was about eight or nine years of age I started doing Judo – mainly for self defence and to learn how to fight. Martial arts was all I ever did. In high school I was already a Golden Gloves boxer and I was fighting in kickboxing. That was my whole sporting thing. Judo was my first style and then I did Shotokan Karate. I continued with Judo for a little while and was doing Kaju Kenbo at the same time. I stayed with my instructor, Walter Godin, from when I was nine or ten until he died two years ago," says Hackleman.

A mixture of Karate, Judo, Kempo and boxing, Kaju Kenbo originated in Hawaii in 1947. The system was created by five martial artists who wanted to improve their street-fighting techniques, and the style has grown in popularity internationally ever since.

Due to his outstanding contribution to the art, 10th degree black belt John Hackleman will be inducted into the Kaju Kenbo Hall of Fame in July, 2004.

"In 1985, when I moved from Hawaii to California, I switched it from Kaju Kenbo to Hawaiian Kempo. I added some things to it, took away some things and started calling it Hawaiian Kempo. I took out the katas and the forms and I threw in more natural fighting techniques and conditioning. Now that’s my style. Like if you see Chuck (Liddell) with the tattoo on his arm, that’s the logo for my school."

Hackleman says back in the ‘90s other martial artists began calling their style Hawaiian Kenpo, but he is the only instructor to spell his Hawaiian Kempo with an ‘m’. In Japanese, the letters ‘m’ and ‘n’ have the same symbol, so the art can be spelt either way. John has been spelling his art as Kempo since 1985.

"Ours is a little more hardcore. In Hawaiian Kenpo they still do forms and stuff like that. When you see the guys such as Chuck fighting, that’s Hawaiian Kempo. Mine has always been a mixed martial art ever since I started it."

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Palma

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Re: Kajukenbo in the UFC
« Reply #11 on: April 09, 2006, 09:55:50 PM »
Good article NYKEMPO!

tycoa7

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Re: Kajukenbo in the UFC
« Reply #12 on: May 21, 2006, 01:36:58 PM »
Kajukenbo cannot totally be used in the UFC due to the disqualificaitons of eye guages, groin strikes, biting, and skin pulling techniques. Not to mention some of the other effective advanced techniques. As for the boxing, and jui-jitsu, and kicking, let it roll.  I was at UFC I and II,in Denver Colorado, and UFC 51 in Vegas, and have been helping cage fighters ever since.  David Harris is one of the toughest cage warriors I know, he is one of my black-belts along with with Walid Zarriffi, and Chris VanShank.  Drew Fickett put on a classic display of Kajukenbo knees when he beat the kid from the Ultimate fighter show.  I usually do not like to chat it up, I would much rather have people come to the gym and train for real.  Drew trained with me for sometime, along with other professional fighters.  Good luck to all my brothers and Christian give me a shout out if you see this.

Remember to put your time into your Kajukenbo and always remain respectfull of your teachers.

SiGung Valdez

Offline Moses Okamoto

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Re: Kajukenbo in the UFC
« Reply #13 on: May 21, 2006, 04:57:45 PM »
Kajukenbo cannot totally be used in the UFC due to the disqualificaitons of eye guages, groin strikes, biting, and skin pulling techniques. Not to mention some of the other effective advanced techniques. As for the boxing, and jui-jitsu, and kicking, let it roll.  I was at UFC I and II,in Denver Colorado, and UFC 51 in Vegas, and have been helping cage fighters ever since.  David Harris is one of the toughest cage warriors I know, he is one of my black-belts along with with Walid Zarriffi, and Chris VanShank.  Drew Fickett put on a classic display of Kajukenbo knees when he beat the kid from the Ultimate fighter show.  I usually do not like to chat it up, I would much rather have people come to the gym and train for real.  Drew trained with me for sometime, along with other professional fighters.  Good luck to all my brothers and Christian give me a shout out if you see this.

Remember to put your time into your Kajukenbo and always remain respectfull of your teachers.

SiGung Valdez

Great insight!

Thank you for posting this.
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