Author Topic: Teaching the blind  (Read 5362 times)

Offline D-Man

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Teaching the blind
« on: May 28, 2003, 07:13:52 PM »
There is currently a blind student enrolled in my school. He started out in private classes for about a month. Then he moved on to train with the rest of us. At first, helpers were assigned to him so that he could get through the class. Now, he rotates in with a variety of people.

Has anyone out there had experience in teaching MA to the blind? I would like some tips, ideas, or helpful information on the subject.

He is also almost def, but can hear somewhat out of his right ear. Great kid.

I don't expect to get many responses to this, if any at all, considering how rare of an occurance this is.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »

Offline envisiontj

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Re: Teaching the blind
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2003, 12:19:33 AM »
Hello -

I have a very good friend that wants to study the Arts.  He is 100% blind, in fact, he has prostethic eyes.  he has VERY good hearing and sensitivity.  I have worked with him some and am very impressed.  The other senses are heightened to a great extreme.  You said that your student is almost deaf too.  Even with that, their physical sensitivity should be great.  Once my friend could get in close (first range) he had a natural talent.  Obviously, at the other ranges, your student will have a difficult time.  I would suggest really working on that first range.  Of course, work the other ranges also.  It was a little taxing working with my friend, but a little patience on your part will go a long ways.  I also believe that teaching a handicapped person will enhance teaching skills a great deal.

I commend you for your efforts.  
I live in Oregon and my friend is now in Alaska.  I have tried to help him find an instructor in AK, but most people won't teach him.

Well, good luck and have fun with your student.

Kajukenbo Forever!!!!!

Trent Junker
envisiontj
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »
Sifu Trent Junker
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Offline Nagi

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Re: Teaching the blind
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2003, 05:58:19 AM »

I have never taught a blind person but I would welcome the challenge however I think an art like AiKi-Ju-Jitsu, Aikido, Judo, Hapkido, BJJ would be a good art to study because there is a lot of feel and touching involved (joint locking/throws/grappling). I did attend a Judo seminar and the Instructor was teaching at a school for the blind and was teaching Judo to them.

Sensei Ron
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »
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Offline Brandi Ross

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Re: Teaching the blind
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2003, 03:34:09 PM »
This is a very challenging subject.  To teach the blind is commendable.  To work with any handicap is difficult.  On that note, does anyone work with Special Olympic Athletes?  When I obtain rank, I would like to work with the local SO program so that they too can better defend themselves.  Nothing hardcore, basics is what I would consider.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »
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Jon Pack

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Re: Teaching the blind
« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2003, 08:40:01 PM »
Teaching special needs students is challenging and very rewarding! I taught a student who has M.S.. At first the student struggled being confined to her power wheel chair. As the training progressed we got her out of her chair and did work with her on her knees/sitting. Then onto aluminum crutches. I have to say that those things smart and she turned them into a real advantage! Over time the student really did well, but did kind of top out just before brown belt.(I moved and was no longer working with her and only saw her at an occasional tournament, here is where I noticed no further rank being awarded)

One thing I would note is to treat the student as normal as possible, they really like to be treated as you would anyone else.

I commend you on your efforts,
Jon Pack
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »

Offline D-Man

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Re: Teaching the blind
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2003, 09:39:42 AM »
I wasn't very clear in my post, it was my teacher who accepted the student. Can't take credit for that.

envisiontj- Tum Pai? I train at the Salmon Creek school in Vancouver.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »

Offline envisiontj

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Re: Teaching the blind
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2003, 02:46:16 PM »
D-Man

No, the Chu'an Fa section under Sifu Sid Lopez.

Trent Junker
envisiontj
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »
Sifu Trent Junker
Realm Of The Tiger Kajukenbo - Portland, OR
Under GM Gerry Scott