Author Topic: What is Tum Pai?  (Read 17111 times)

TumPai

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What is Tum Pai?
« on: January 01, 2003, 09:18:32 PM »
  Greetings,

  I am not sure who is going to end up moderating this Forum but I figured I could post  a little about how Tum Pai came to be for those that stop in.  


  The original concept of Tum Pai was brought to life by Professor Emperado from the knowledge he learned from Professors Lum, Lau King, and Wong.  But the actual art as we know it today was concieved by Sigung Jon Loren.  Through his knowledge of Tai Chi Chuan and Kajukenbo he devised Northern Tum Pai Gung Fu with a special consideration given to internal energy development, true combat theory, universal philosophy and outdoor survival.
  Tum Pai means "Central Way", not only the development of your center line, but also the knowledge and understanding of how to do things the easiest way possible.
  Sigung Jon Loren, with the help of Sifus Doug Bailey, Bob Heuer, Jay Burkley, Jerry Weldon, Bob Adams, and Blair Schmidt, have brought Northern Tum Pai to the development it is today.

 :)   :D   :)   :D   :)   :D   ;D   ;D   ;D   :)   :D   :)   :D   :)   :D  
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »

Sigung666

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Re: What is Tum Pai?
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2003, 06:37:11 PM »
Tum Pai is one of the four branch styles of Kajukenbo. The original style of Tum Pai was put together by Sijo Adriano Emperado, Sifu Al Dacascos and Sifu Al Dela Cruz in the early 60's to create an advanced style for the Kajukenbo system. In the mid-60's the developments that made up Tum Pai became incorporated into what was called Ch'uan Fa.

In 1971, Sifu Jon A. Loren started incorporating the concepts of Tai-Chi and Southern Sil-lum into his Kajukenbo classes. This was called Northern Kajukenbo until 1976. In 1976, while staying with Sijo Emperado in Hawaii, he demonstrated his concepts and techniques and asked if he could call it Tum Pai and bring the name back to life. Sijo Emperado granted permission with the acknowledgement that the original Tum Pai followed a different path than the revised Tum Pai soft style. The name Tum Pai wich means "central way" fits the Tai-Chi concept blended into the Kajukenbo format.

With the help of his advanced Black Sash students Sifu Loren incorporated the Tum Pai techniques into Kajukenbo producing Kajukenbo Tum Pai in 1977. At this time Sifu Loren started working on an advanced section to Tum Pai. This work lasted 10 years resulting in a system then known as Yam Foon Jeet Sow Fut (night wind intercepting palm) which was noted for its leg disabling applications, reverse open hand slapping techniques, sensitivity training and connecting man and nature in a martial way. In 1979 Sifu Loren simplified the name to Northern Tum Pai, a branch of the Kajukenbo system. In 1984, Sijo Emperado officially certified Northern Tum Pai as the soft style branch of Kajukenbo.
Kajukenbo Tum Pai............
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »

Offline Sub7

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Re:What is Tum Pai?
« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2003, 10:07:24 PM »
Personally I would recommend Sifu Mark Casey and his wife Sifu Elizabeth.  Knowing from personal experience, they are both excellent Tum Pai instructors. Considering if they are not too busy of course.    ;D
Sibak
Sifu Morgan Olsen 3rd degree, Emperado Method, Senior Grand Master Kaanana
Student Middle East KSDI

Offline Serene

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Re:What is Tum Pai?
« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2003, 03:20:05 AM »
Sigung 666:

You mention quite a few comments. However, I am curious who are you? It states that you are guest. Can you please elaborate on who and where you are from.

Regards.
Sifu Serene Terrazas
Head Instructor
Terrazas Kajukenbo
American Canyon, Ca.

Offline John Bishop

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Re:What is Tum Pai?
« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2003, 05:03:54 PM »
Sibak:

Sigung666 apparently has not been on the board for a while.  He is Sigung Ray Trujillo from New Jersey via Puerto Rico.
Sometimes people are thrown off by the "666" designation.  He explained that it means, 6th generation, 6th degree, 6th Kajukenbo black belt promoted in Puerto Rico.  
John Bishop  8th Degree-Original Method 
Under Grandmaster Gary Forbach
K.S.D.I. # 478, FMAA


"You watch, once I'm gone, all the snakes will start popping their heads up!"  Sijo Emperado

Ben Fajardo

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Re:What is Tum Pai?
« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2003, 07:18:49 PM »
The original style of Kajukenbo's Tum Pai was put together by Professor Adriano D. Emperado, Sifu Al Dacascos and Sifu Al Dela Cruz in the early 60's to create an advanced style for the Kajukenbo system.
 
In the mid-60's the Tum Pai name was changed to Ch'uan Fa. In 1971, Sifu Jon A. Loren started incorporating the concepts of Tai-Chi and Southern Sil-Lum to his Kajukenbo classes.
This was called Northern Kajukenbo until 1976. In 1976 while staying with the Professor in Hawaii, he demonstrated his concepts and techniques and asked at the time if he could call it Tum Pai and bring the name back to life.
 
Professor granted permission with the acknowledgement that the original Tum Pai follow a different path than the revised Tum Pai soft style.
 
In 1984 Professor Emperado officially certified Northern Tum Pai as the soft style branch of Kajukenbo.
 

Noted Northern Tum Pai Traing curriculum
1. Eleven Tai-Chi and Paqua forms
2. Twelve Chi Gau (circulating exercises) forms and exercises
3. Eighteen Northern Kajukenbo Tum Pai forms
4. Various weapon forms
5. Twenty three Night Wind (Advanced) forms and their applications
 
 
1. Grab arts
2. Basic Tricks
3. Punching attacks
4. Kicking attacks
5. Multiple attacks
6. Knife, Club, Chain tricks
7. Throwing arts
8. Push hands (4 levels)
9. Chi-Sao (6 levels)
10. Soft style grappling
11. Knife and club grappling
12. Da Lu- joint grappling
13. Outdoor sensitivity training
14. Herbal Medicine training


Ben Fajardo

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Re:What is Tum Pai?
« Reply #6 on: October 01, 2003, 07:20:54 PM »
Northern Tum Pai The Hybrid Gung Fu
 
The initial foundation of Northern Tum Pai is based upon the Chinese combined classical structures of combat, Tai Chi Ch'uan and the street wise techniques of the Northern Kajukenbo system. To this effect it is noted for four specific structural characteristics as its basis for creativity and originalty.
 
1. Tum Pai Tai Chi Soft Style Forms:
This forms were created over a 20 year span to emphasize non-opposition, circular redirection (small circle theory) as opposed to linear motion, relaxed non muscular movement that emphasizes internal energy gathering, energy pulling, reversing of energy and noted especially for its explosive releasing of energy. Tum Pai is thus a style of Tai Chi that teaches the student Tai Chi energy movement coupled with realistic martial techniques. Tum Pai is considured combative Tai Chi in motion.
 
2. Soft Style Applications of Tai Chi Ch'uan:
Northern Tum Pai is characterized by the fact that it is in essence the street application of Tai Chi Ch'uan, using its theories of evasion, yielding, rooting, reversing and redirecting the flow of attack concept in a non-muscular way, allowing a person of any size to defend themselves. Tai Chi practice is a regular part of Tum Pai training.
 
3. Tendon Structure:
Northern Tum Pai expression is based on a relaxed tendon structure concept which aligns the overall posture-arms, legs, feet and hands, structured so that it eliminates muscularity, and opens the pathways for transmitted through, thus enhancing speed, reaction and explosion.
 
Outdoor Training:
It is one of the few systems that incorporate outdoor martial survival training, living and trained sensitivity awareness developed from harmony with nature as a regular part of its curriculum. Adavanced testing for higher ranks incorporates these outdoor training skills to enhance a practitioner both mentally and spiritually.
 
As a hybrid Gung Fu system, Northern Tum Pai differs from classical systems for it contains emphisis on defense against American boxing, wrestling and advanced street fighting attacks rather than oriental attack. Not having one set pattern for defense against these, it teaches to change its flow and pattern to whatever type situation occurs.
 
It takes years to learn the higher levels of Tum Pai the structures are the tools to work with, so that basically a student would never run out of new tools (techniques) and would be a student all his life. There is Allways more to learn about the system, more to learn about hinself and more to create and experiment with to fit himself. During his life in the art, the student would be touching tradition but yet, not tied or bound to any structure for these are just many rays of light to many paths out of the darkness.
 
Taken From the
Northern Tum Pai Association booklet
by Sigung Jon A. Loren
 
Nubreed Martial Arts Systems
Sifu/Guru Ben Fajardo

Offline Serene

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Re:What is Tum Pai?
« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2003, 06:42:42 PM »
Are there any books on Tum Pai that you would recommend? ???

I wish I had gotten to spend more time with Prof. Loren when he was here this past August. Next time I will plan my time wisely. :-\

Thank you to those that have contributed to this post. It's very interesting.  ;D

Soifua,
Sifu Serene Terrazas
Head Instructor
Terrazas Kajukenbo
American Canyon, Ca.

Offline guarded

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Re:What is Tum Pai?
« Reply #8 on: December 11, 2003, 06:17:26 AM »
Personally I would recommend Sifu Mark Casey and his wife Sifu Elizabeth.  Knowing from personal experience, they are both excellent Tum Pai instructors. Considering if they are not too busy of course.    ;D
I went to H.S. with them.  Sifu Mark Casey recieved his BB from my teacher Sifu Steve Larson.  
Jerry Guard
Kajukenbo Tum Pai Brown/Black Sash under Prof. Steve Larson          My everyday stance is my fighting stance.  My fighting stance is my everyday stance.