Author Topic: Should I try Hapkido?  (Read 13113 times)

Offline KajuJKDFighter

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Re: Should I try Hapkido?
« Reply #30 on: May 19, 2007, 02:02:04 AM »
Sort of Hoss like I guess...
GM John E Bono DC
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Champions aren't made in the gyms. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them a desire,a dream,a vision

Offline KajuJKDFighter

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Re: Should I try Hapkido?
« Reply #31 on: May 19, 2007, 02:03:51 AM »
Now
GM John E Bono DC
9th Degree Grand Master Gaylord Method Kajukenbo
Full Instructor-Hartsell's Jeet Kune Do Grappling Assoc
Chief Instructor Bono's Jeet Kune Do/Kajukenbo
Champions aren't made in the gyms. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them a desire,a dream,a vision

Offline KajuJKDFighter

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Re: Should I try Hapkido?
« Reply #32 on: May 19, 2007, 02:08:41 AM »
GM John E Bono DC
9th Degree Grand Master Gaylord Method Kajukenbo
Full Instructor-Hartsell's Jeet Kune Do Grappling Assoc
Chief Instructor Bono's Jeet Kune Do/Kajukenbo
Champions aren't made in the gyms. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them a desire,a dream,a vision

Offline KajuJKDFighter

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Re: Should I try Hapkido?
« Reply #33 on: May 19, 2007, 02:12:38 AM »
GM John E Bono DC
9th Degree Grand Master Gaylord Method Kajukenbo
Full Instructor-Hartsell's Jeet Kune Do Grappling Assoc
Chief Instructor Bono's Jeet Kune Do/Kajukenbo
Champions aren't made in the gyms. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them a desire,a dream,a vision

Offline KajuJKDFighter

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Re: Should I try Hapkido?
« Reply #34 on: May 19, 2007, 02:24:12 AM »
where Billy trained....well maybe
http://www.glumbert.com/media/acrobatic
GM John E Bono DC
9th Degree Grand Master Gaylord Method Kajukenbo
Full Instructor-Hartsell's Jeet Kune Do Grappling Assoc
Chief Instructor Bono's Jeet Kune Do/Kajukenbo
Champions aren't made in the gyms. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them a desire,a dream,a vision

Vala Au

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Re: Should I try Hapkido?
« Reply #35 on: May 19, 2007, 03:04:33 PM »
Professor John,

Thanks for doing the homework.  Agreed, the hat is kinda 10 gallon like Hoss".  Maybe Billy Jack should've done the Okinawan stuff, he sure has aged.


Offline TFG

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Re: Should I try Hapkido?
« Reply #36 on: May 25, 2007, 01:52:25 AM »
Thank you everyone for your inputs. I'm sorry for the long update, but I wanted to give you a good idea of what happened, so I could get better feedback.

I went to the gym today with my daughter, and we trained our Ka before, the Hapkido class began. Before I could introduced myself, the instructor said we were welcome to continue our training during his class
(a big aerobics room with wooden floors and walled mirrors makes for a perfect Dojo.) I introduced myself and asked if we could watch the class. He said we were more then welcome to watch and could join in anytime.

We exchanged words for a few minutes and it turns out he had taken a few Ka classes under my Sifu Linda Walker, while my other Sifu Brian Walker and I were deployed overseas. I asked what style of Hapkido he comes from, and he told me his instructor was traditional, and that he was too. He said he has not made many modifications with the exception of a few follow-ups he likes to add to the ground work. He said they have no forms and the majority of weapons work is done in the later belts.

He named 4-5 people above his family tree, but the only name I remember was the founder Master Choi. His name is Russ, he said he is a 5th degree. Don't even ask me to pronounce his title  ;D

I watched them warm up for about 25 minutes. Pretty boring to watch, but there were some interesting things I wouldn't mind adding to my routine.

Then I watched them do about 15 minutes of kick drills. I was glad to be sitting on my butt and it looked like the 5 students were getting their moneys worth.

After that they paired up and did some blocking/striking drills with each other. By this time it was starting to look like fun. I told my daughter (the ginnie pig) to jump in, but she was acting shy. I bribed her with a dollar and it still didn't work! Then I nicely ordered her to jump in. She went to the far corner and kinda just stood there. The instructor told her to jump in, and that's all it took.

My daughter Ashley is 10, very skinny and a little tall for her age. I am proud to say that she has the potential to be a much better Martial Artiest, then I could ever hope to be. With her mental ability, flexibility and eagerness to listen, learn and retain, she makes for an excellent student. She paired up with a 14 year old girl and that was all she wrote.

They moved on to some knife defense techniques.  I saw a little of Ka in there, the only difference, is they seem to combine more techniques into one defense. Hence the quote below
The only thing that I will think twice is using some joint locks that required to much precision to be effective.

Afterwards they moved on to swords, both Chinese's broad and Japanese Katana. It was neat to watch. I'm not a big weapons guy myself, I'm more of a realist and the reality is I don't carry a sword. However I do have an appreciation for tradition in Martial Arts.

About this time the class had wrapped up. I had the impression the instructor threw a bit more into this class then usual. Perhaps it was to impress us, or to give us an overall picture of Hapkido. The instructor himself was very laid back, informal and was constantly making jokes. However when he spoke of techniques, he was very precise and explained the reasons behind them. He seemed to have good knowledge on pressure points and the natural  movements of the body. He later explained to me that some instructors were so strict, students would have to stand at attention and wait to ask for help, or seek the senior student first. He told me he felt that was not an effective way to teach his students.

The students there were all within the Yellow Belt level (1st 3 belts.) I guess my Daughter got lucky, he normally doesn't teach kids. He has seen us train before and I was honored that he didn't try to exclude her. I told him of my intentions to continue my family's training with Kajukenbo. I let him know that I was interested in his class, but that
I had to think it over a bit. As a Third Brown with kids who are Green & Orange, we are at a critical point in training where if we don't continue to improve, then we will have thrown away the last 3-4 years.

IMHO, based on what I saw, I would have to believe Kajukenbo is more effective then Hapkido for reality based self defense. At this point I'm not sure what to think. I guess I'll just have to think it over.

Thanks



Jason Hahn
Student 3rd Brn Original Method
Under Sifu Brian & Linda Walker

Offline cirillo

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Re: Should I try Hapkido?
« Reply #37 on: May 25, 2007, 08:39:07 AM »
Sounds like your experience with Hapkido was similar to mine.  The instructor doesn't sound bad at all.  He is totally correct about the discipline thing in class.  In NY there were several times I had seen students get punched in the chest for not saying 'yes sir' quickly enough, lol. ::)

At least the instructor knew who Choi was, that is a good sign.  I am curious what the other names were and what branch under Choi he is from, but it sounds like you didn't catch the next level down.  My understanding is that there were somewhere between 8-12 top students under Choi that started their own flavors of Hapkido that arises from a combination of systems with a Chinese art and Aiki Jujitsu along with the Korean kicking arts.  Each of the students had a different take on how this was to be presented to students and my understanding is that they all think they are teaching the only real one.   Who knows what Choi really wanted, he isn't around.

In terms of the 5th degree title, I believe it would be Sa Bu Nim (basically meaning master), but am not 100% sure my memory serves me correctly (I haven't seen those people for over 16 years).

Good luck with making a decision on it.  My suggestion is to just train hard with your kids and maybe pull in some (adult) training partners from your area that are open minded about banging.  It would probably be more fun and you would improve more quickly on the stuff you seem to consider more important.  Also, if you can train consistently to maintain your Kaju, you won't have to play catch up when you are back in an area where you have a Chief instructor.  If you speak to your current Chief Instructor, they may even let you open up a satellite school as a junior instructor.  Then you may be able to rank people that train with you (should they want to be) at least at the junior levels.  Your instructor can come out for a visit (or you can go to them) for higher level testing.  Just a thought.  I have seen other people at your rank do this sort of thing from a distance with their instructor and it sometimes works very well (I know of one that still has his distance school and is now ranked at 3rd degree black through this type of training and running an active school). 8)

Sifu Jeffrey D. Cirillo,  7th Degree Black belt in Wun Hop Kuen Do under GM Al Dacascos and 3rd Degree in FaChuan (Blossom Fist) under Sifu Bill Owens with over 35 years experience in the martial arts.
College Station, TX

Offline TFG

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Re: Should I try Hapkido?
« Reply #38 on: May 25, 2007, 11:59:54 AM »
One of the things the instructor had mentioned to me was that Hapkido & Kook Sool Won were kinda like "kissing Cousins." He also mentioned Aikido was similar too.  As a military guy, he had trained all over the place and mentioned he had spent time in Germany. I asked him if there was an organization he belonged to or one that was similar to his style, but he didn't mention one.

As far as the idea of the distance school, we had discussed it. We have a student black here who is 15. We really didn't want to close the school, but it was the right thing to do. My Sibak is a teenager and has been heavily involved in Kajukenbo for the last 5-6 years. We are still talking and planning on training about once a month. In addition, Professor Harry Herrera is about a three hour drive away.

I'll try to get more info on the Hapkido Family tree next time I talk to him.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2007, 09:24:52 PM by TFG »
Jason Hahn
Student 3rd Brn Original Method
Under Sifu Brian & Linda Walker

Offline TFG

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Re: Should I try Hapkido?
« Reply #39 on: May 30, 2007, 11:50:14 AM »
Update

I tried the class. It had it's moments and I enjoyed leaning some new wrist locks.
The student I partnered up with was my size, so that was cool. I think he was glad
I was there because when he tried some of his techniqes, he was surprized I didn't buckle
over. I told him he was going to have to apply a lot more pressure (actual contact)
and he could increase his speed.

He has having a blast trying his techniqes at 70% speed and the other students were watching
us as I was getting slammed to the floor and having him to crank harder on the wrist before I'd tap.

I was a bit surprised I was picking up the techniques easily and I give that credit to my Kajukenbo training.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2007, 09:24:17 PM by TFG »
Jason Hahn
Student 3rd Brn Original Method
Under Sifu Brian & Linda Walker