Author Topic: The Influence of the Filipino Arts in Kajukenbo  (Read 6331 times)

Offline jccedcon

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The Influence of the Filipino Arts in Kajukenbo
« on: September 13, 2012, 06:15:32 PM »
I am a student of Sigung Tom Elias in Tucson Arizona. He wrote up a blog post about of the influence of the Filipino Arts in Kajukenbo. It makes for an interesting discussion:
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KA is for Kali

It is a mantra for those of us who have spent any length of time in Kajukenbo when explaining our system: KA is for Karate, JU is for Judo and Ju Jitsu, KEN is for Kenpo and BO is for Chinese Boxing or Kung Fu. We have said it a thousand times. I humbly suggest that given the strong influence of the Filipino Martial Arts one could say KA is equally for both Karate and Kali just as JU is for Judo and Ju Jitsu...

http://mixedmartialstudio.com/node/378
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I have only posted on the forum here once or twice. I do spend a lot of time reading posts and greatly enjoy the discussions here. I am curious to see what everyone thinks of the influence and significance of Kali in Kajukenbo.

Since my signature is incomplete, my name is John Conaway. I am a second degree brown belt. We train at Mixed Martial Studio.


John Conaway
Under Sigung Tom Elias

Offline Rev. Brian Henderson

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Re: The Influence of the Filipino Arts in Kajukenbo
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2012, 11:19:39 PM »
Well, here's my humble opinion.  I wouldn't have problem if individual Sifus and above described their curriculum in that way provided they can demonstrate and explain that influence's presence in their structured teaching.  I can, and I do that very thing, but I also realize and respect that not everyone's Kajukenbo will reflect that influence. It all depends on their lineage and/or cross training experience.
Rev. (Prof.) Brian T. Henderson (KSDI# 641)
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NickS

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Re: The Influence of the Filipino Arts in Kajukenbo
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2012, 12:36:16 AM »
I don't think one should go so far as to say that KA JU KEN BO stands for anything other than what it has been since the beginning.  It is one thing to cross train in other styles, but nobody should be teaching that the word "Kajukenbo" means anything other than what the Original Five Founders said it was.
Just my humble opinion.

Offline punisher73

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Re: The Influence of the Filipino Arts in Kajukenbo
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2012, 07:24:15 AM »
The problem I have with it is this, during my research of Prof. Chow I have come across students of Chow's that ALL have said that he favored limb destructions and that the opening moves of the punch counters and even GM Kuoha's (Kara-Ho Kenpo) 12 line techniques learned from Prof. Chow all reflect that limb destruction aspect. 

I would argue that the limb destructions came from the kenpo training with Prof. Chow and was indicative of his style.
Kevin A. Hirakis
SW Michigan

Offline Greg Hoyt

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Re: The Influence of the Filipino Arts in Kajukenbo
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2012, 10:03:22 AM »
We teach that the KA stands for Karate. 
On the other hand, Limb Destruction has always been a part of Filipino Martial Arts. 
Sifu Greg Hoyt
Hoyt's Kajukenbo, Peoria, Arizona
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Offline Dean Goldade

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Re: The Influence of the Filipino Arts in Kajukenbo
« Reply #5 on: September 16, 2012, 10:33:24 AM »
The FMA's were around well before Kajukenbo... The majority of the Kajukenbo founders were Filipino... Wow.. Amazing to find out we have FMA influence in Kajukenbo... The thing is the influence is there, but not many teach the depth of the FMA and it's translation to Kajukenbo... I recommend you seek out GM Max Pallen.. He has taken the Gaylord method punch and grab arts and Pinans, and translated them to single stick, double stick and the blade or daga... It's out there if you look.
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Offline punisher73

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Re: The Influence of the Filipino Arts in Kajukenbo
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2012, 06:58:41 AM »
The same has been done with American Kenpo (using the sticks/knife in place of empty hands).  Does that mean that it's also FMA influenced, or is it that almost all empty hand arts can be modified to use a weapon?

Kevin A. Hirakis
SW Michigan

Offline Sojourner

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Re: The Influence of the Filipino Arts in Kajukenbo
« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2012, 08:58:45 AM »
Thank you for sharing the link to that blog. During my two decades of "connecting the dots" with regards to aligning specific arts with kajukenbo techniques, I couldn't agree more with your kali assessment. I started my kajukenbo training in the early 1990s and after receiving my blackbelt, dwelve heavily into the individual styles that comprise the hybrid art. While training in kali silat, I too noticed vast similarities in kajukenbo and kali, maybe even more so than with karate (tang soo do). Another observation is that different instructors tend to emphasize certain arts more heavily than others in their kajukenbo curriculum.
Larry L. Carter, PhD
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Offline John Bishop

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Re: The Influence of the Filipino Arts in Kajukenbo
« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2012, 01:02:00 PM »
According to Sijo himself, his escrima training around the time of the founding of Kajukenbo, was very basic and limited.  He did not seriously study escrima until his 30's.  And he only learned from 2 people during his lifetime.  The below description reflects what Sijo told me about his escrima training.

  His escrima training started around the age of 11, when he (Sijo) was living in Kauai with his older brother Larry.  Although he was more interested in childhood activities and didn't take this training too seriously, he did learn some escrima movements, and the 12 basic strikes from a man he only knew as "Professor Alex".   
   Around 1960, he greatly expanded his knowledge of escrima by training with his stepfather, Alfredo Peralta*.  Peralta was originally from Ilocos Norte, Luzon, Philippines.  He had trained in a combination of the Ilocano, Visayan, and Tagalog styles of escrima.  He was also a well known escrima fighter who fought in matches at the Civic Auditorium in Honolulu, before these matches were eventually stopped by the Territory Gaming Commission.   (* In the past Peralta has been mistakenly referred to as "Alexandro", or "Issac", or multiple people).
Peralta' escrima system specialized in techniques using the single stick, stick and dagger, and single dagger.  In describing his training, Emperado said that they very rarely trained with rattan sticks.  Instead they would take 2x4 wood boards and taper down the ends to make handles.  And then they would workout with these heavy sticks.  He said that "after a workout with the 2x4 you could make a rattan stick go like lighting". 
« Last Edit: October 05, 2012, 01:04:31 PM by John Bishop »
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Offline Ron Baker

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Re: The Influence of the Filipino Arts in Kajukenbo
« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2012, 02:49:40 PM »
Quote
It is a mantra for those of us who have spent any length of time in Kajukenbo when explaining our system: KA is for Karate, JU is for Judo and Ju Jitsu, KEN is for Kenpo and BO is for Chinese Boxing or Kung Fu.

The reality is that there's so much built-in freedom in Kaju, that what most of us do (today) probably wouldn't fit the original definition anyway.

Interesting topic, though.

WADR,

RB 
 
Sigung (Shihan) Ron Baker
Kajukenbo 5280 MMA Foundation
Under GM Jason Groff
Ordonez Kajukenbo Ohana