Author Topic: Forms for Kids???  (Read 3340 times)

Karazenpo

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Forms for Kids???
« on: March 04, 2003, 08:58:30 AM »
  On the topic "Junior Black Belts"  TheGuardian gave me an idea for a new topic when he mentioned about having a set curriculum for children. So, how about this one.......Who does or doesn't teach forms to children?(any age)and why? or why not?
   Personally, I admit it takes a lot of patience but I have had success at it. My reasoning? Who can benefit more from balance and hand/foot coordination movements than young children? Even if I have a four or five year old and all he/she gets down is 1/4 to 1/2 of the first form for now, I consider that worthwhile.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »

Offline Nagi

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Re: Forms for Kids???
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2003, 09:21:50 AM »
Shihan Joe you are not kidding when you said you need patience but I also had sucess at it too. I have had a few student's with ADD & ADHD and they didn't do all that bad with the forms. In Hapkido there is only one form and since the kids program is restructured I incorporated some of my Kempo forms. I give 1/2 of the first form to the white belts and I feel it gives them good movement & balance and it also improves their line drill's with the coordination they have acquired from doing form's.  
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »
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Karazenpo

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Re: Forms for Kids???
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2003, 09:46:10 AM »
Sensei Ron,
                   I've also had a number of kids with ADD & ADHD (there must be something in the water) and they have done very well and it is true and I've always said it, the key is patience! Although after a night of forms class I'm primed and ready for "Miller Time" when I get home!!!!!!!!!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »

Offline Gints Klimanis

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Re: Forms for Kids???
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2003, 12:05:26 PM »
I've been teaching two kids, lately.  While I think that
KajuKenbo forms are interesting for kids, most are too
long, even if they have sections that are repeated in
a mirror fashion.  I've found that teaching the defense
arts in a forms fashion is easier for kids.  Rather than
have the kids do complete iterations of, say, Grab Arts
(CHA3 Kenpo names) the entire class, I break up the
class into sections:

--- Basics ---
1) Air hand techniques from horse stance
2) Air kicks from guarded stance
3) Hand and kick target practice on human opponent
(light contact)

--- Arts ---
1) Air Grab Arts (parts)
2) Entire Grab Arts
3) Technical focus on elements of Grab Arts


The "air" grab arts are essentially synchronized forms.
The kids find comfort in the herd mentality.  When I
say 1, we repeat the first move of a Grab Art, which
is usually an upperbody movement coupled with
a step.  We repeat the first part of Grab Arts #1-5
on command, with three iterations per Art, performed
sequentially:  1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3 etc.   Then,
the first part of each art is performed sequentially:
1, 2, 3, 4, 5 for three iterations of the entire series.
Then, I randomize it:  1, 3, 4, 2, 5.  Then, we do
the same for the first two parts of the Art.  I've found
that by emphasizing the beginning of the Art, kids
seem to have a better retention of the entire art.
It's a method similar to memorizing the alphabet.

When these Arts are strung together in this manner, you essentially have a solo "form."  I think it's also
important to emphasize solo iteration so that the
kids have a practice method for home use.  If they
are taught that the Arts require another person
as a target, they deny themselves the opportunity
for imaginary visualization.

So, in conclusion, for kids, I find that high drill
rates of a small set of material repeated in various
forms is a good way to teach kids.  Most kids (and some
adults) have a short attention span and need to have
variable mental and physical stimuli to learn.
This is my personal experience.







« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »
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Mike Nagano

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Re: Forms for Kids???
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2003, 01:21:42 PM »
Nice idea Gints.  It's easier to treat a short attention span with less information and repeat that information until it is learned before going on to new stuff.  This is a good method for successful instruction with any population.

As for the earlier comments on teaching students with ADD or ADHD....I teach students with ADD or ADHD for a living (most have learning disabilities).  People often blend these conditions together.  They are very different.  On a very basic level, students with ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) simply have a hard time paying attention.  In essence, they pay attention to nothing (for a very long time).  Students with ADHD (Attention Deficit with Hyperactivity Disorder) simply pay attention to everything.  They have a hard time filtering out information they need to learn and other information (or distractions).

By breaking things down and reteaching them over and over, the students will learn.  Students with ADD or ADHD do not necessarily have learning disabilities.  They just have difficulty with their attention spans.  Such students have a great capacity to learn and understand.  Finding the way to teach them is the key.  However, both students will benefit from simplicity and structure.    And, of course, a lot of patience...a whole lot of patience!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »

Mike Nagano

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Re: Forms for Kids???
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2003, 02:35:40 PM »
I noticed an oops in my last response.  When I say that "most have learning disabilities" I don't mean those with ADD or ADHD in general.  Just in reference to my students.  I should also clarify that I'm a special education teacher by profession.  I am also an instructor under John Bishop.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »

Karazenpo

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Re: Forms for Kids???
« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2003, 03:59:01 PM »
Yeah Mike, you're so right,  "a lot of patience", but its all well worth it when you finally see the "finished product"!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by 1054443600 »